Epi 201 Eddie Fyvie 1st Rickson Gracie Cup

This week we talk to Ricardo Almeida black belt Eddie Fyvie. Eddie is organizing an innovative tournament called the Rickson Gracie Cup. This tournament will feature both BJJ, self-defense, and a seminar by Rickson Gracie.

We talk about:

  • The Rickson Gracie Cup September 9 and 10
  • A Rickson Gracie seminar the evening of September 10
  • Promoting self defense with BJJ
  • The basic rules for the self defense contest
  • What is was like to host the biggest BJJ seminar in US history
  • Teaching BJJ to 320 people at the same time
  • What does self defense bring to jiu-jitsu
  • Not having advantages in this tournament
  • Using a stalling clock like a shot clock
  • Giving incentives for competitors to finish the match

Links:

Quote of the week: “You must not fight too often with one enemy, or you will teach him all your art of war.” Napoleon Bonaparte

Article of the week: Understand Where The Danger Is! And Don’t Be There!

A special thank you to Berry White for making a brief appearance!

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Catch us next week for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast

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Visiting another school…. Getting the most out of a drop in

Anyone who has trained jiu jitsu for any length of time has probably had the itch to drop in at another school for a visit. Maybe you just want to meet new people, maybe you want to be exposed to a different training environment, or maybe you are just going to be out of town for an extended period of time and visiting another school will be your only opportunity to train. Whatever the reason, visiting another school can be a great experience. It can also be a little intimidating or overwhelming for some people. Whether you are excited about the opportunity or are a little nervous about it – here are a few tips that may help you get the most out of it.
1. Identify as many schools in the area that may be worth visiting. This will give you the best odds of finding one that will be a good fit for you. It sometimes takes multiple web searches to find all the schools in a given area. Sometimes, some schools will show on a search for “BJJ near…” and other schools in the same area will show for “Brazilian Jiu Jitsu near….”. It is also worth just asking around. If you know other people that do jiu jitsu and live in the area you are looking to visit shoot them a text and ask. Jiu Jitsu forums and message boards can also be helpful.
2. Do some research. You can find out a lot about a school by visiting their website, social media sites, checking reviews, and just asking around. You can get a pretty good idea about a school’s jiu jitsu style and the training environment by checking their website and social media and by asking a few questions on the phone or via email/messaging. This will help you find a school to visit that’s right for you.
3. Call ahead. Some information I try to get on a phone call: A) Is the class I’m interested in appropriate for my skill level and open to drop ins? B) What’s the drop-in fee? C) Are there any uniform requirements? Some gyms prefer white gis. D) Make sure I have the correct address and directions.
4. Go with an open mind. No matter how much research you do and how many questions you ask sometimes you show up at a school and find the class is nothing like what you were expecting. You can still have a positive experience and get a lot out of the class…. but this is unlikely to happen if you are not open to trying something new and doing things a different way.
5. Be humble. You don’t have anything to prove to anyone and most people don’t like a visitor coming in and trying to be king of the mat. Start off slow and loose during sparring. With each round as you get to know the group and they get to know you, you can ratchet it up a notch. I’d rather leave the class feeling like I didn’t do my best jiu jitsu than leave the class feeling like I wouldn’t be welcomed back.
6. Make some connections. Jiu Jitsu is largely about the journey and the friends you make. At a minimum, make a social media connection so you can follow them and keep in touch. If things went well and you felt like things really clicked, exchange contact information. You never know when you’ll be back in the area or when someone from that school might be in your area and you can get together again for some training.
7. Leave the school a good review online. It’s not easy building a team and running a business. Good reviews help. If they treated you well and you were able to get some quality training in, the least you can do is take five minutes to leave them a good review.
One final thought: The visit will be what you make. Some things are out of your control—the size of the school, how accomplished the instructor is, the skill level of the other students on the mat, etc. However, you do have control over your attitude, your effort level, your preparation before the visit, etc. Put as much effort into finding the right school and properly preparing for the class as you do once you get there and you will have an awesome visit.
Train hard. Train smart. Get better.

By Joe Thomas Find more articles by Joe Thomas here

Epi 168 Keys To A Strong Kids Program With Korbett Miller

This week we are proud to bring you Korbett Miller. Today you will learn a lot about developing the next generation of BJJ practitioners. Miller is a first degree BJJ black belt under Saulo and Xande RIbeiro. This episode is a must listen for anyone involved with teaching BJJ to adults or kids.korbett-miller

We talk about:

  • Overcoming difficulties as a kid with martial arts
  • The current coaching environment for kids programs
  • How to teach kids differently than adults
  • Teaching on command
  • Drills that are played as games
  • Getting deliberate practice
  • The “Dead Bug” drill to help learn the hip bump sweep
  • Character development for kids in BJJ over other martial arts
  • Fixed mindset vs growth mindset
  • Why you should avoid “Person Praise” to students
  • The importance of a great introductory lesson for kids
  • Some of the details of the introductory lesson
  • Why he does not give kids a belt without earning it first
  • The importance of focus and respect
  • Having kids be a first time listener and doing things the right way right away
  • Not just letting the new kids just blend in with the rest of the class
  • Why almost no one regrets long term martial arts training
  • Developing a talent hot bed in your school
  • Why he encourages kids to compete
  • What to say to a kid after a loss
  • Lessons learned while competing
  • How to let kids start rolling
  • How to teach kids submissions
  • How he has attracted 250 kids to his BJJ school
  • Developing a kids program
  • Marketing a kids martial arts program

Links:

Quote of the week: “Be at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let every new year find you a better man.” Benjamin Franklin

We have the results of The BjjBrick Coach of the Year Contest. We are
Your-First-Year-Of-BJJ-artwork-1199

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Gary’s audio book is called “How to sneak into the kids division and get gold or a cold”

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Epi 156 BJJ in China with Andy Pi

This week we are excited to bring you an interview with Andy Pi. Andy is a pioneer in bringing jiu-jitsu to China. He also won the first televised MMA fight in China. There is a lot of ground covered in this interview as we talk about jiu-jtisu in China.andy-pi

We talk about:

  • His start in Jiu-Jitsu in 1994
  • His MMA that was the first fight on broadcast TV in China
  • Early Jiu-Jitsu in USA and China
  • Jiu-jitsu in Beijing
  • A critical look at Jiu-Jitsu in China
  • MMA compared to self-defense
  • ADCC in China
  • People doing Jiu-Jitsu for fun
  • Kids doing Jiu-Jitsu
  • Why instructors are a big factor in determining if students stick with grappling
  • New students avoiding injuries
  • The idea of “go hard or go home”
  • A lesson on checking your ego

Links:

Quote of the week: “Friendship.. is not something you learn in school. But if you haven’t learned the meaning of friendship, you really haven’t learned anything.” Muhammad Ali

Article of the week: On the Meaning of a Belt

Gary tells us about his book he is working on called “The Jiu-Jitsu Guide to Halloween”

We are also looking for submissions for coach of the year. Send your essay about what makes your coach great to BjjBrick@gmail.com

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The BjjBrick Wall of Support is being constructed and you can help

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Catch us next week for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast

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Something You Need to Know About the BJJ Gauntlet

In many Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) schools, students occasionally get whipped by belts. This is typically done as a right of passage during a belt promotion, birthday, or some type of celebration. Students line up with their BJJ belts in hand and whip the person who must run the gauntlet. Today I want to bring this dark topic to light.

Belt whipping meme bjj

Hazing students has a negative effect on self-esteem

BJJ brings many positive-life changing benefits to the people that train, none of these benefits are a product of belt whipping. Belt whipping is a form of hazing (illegal in 44 US states). It is seen as a way to prove yourself to be part of a tough group. Many kids and adults are in BJJ programs to learn how to not be the victim of a bully, and build confidence. They may find themselves in a room full of bullies with belts peer pressuring them to do something that they would rather not do. One of two things usually happens in this situation. The student realizes that this is an unhealthy environment and they leave the school. Or the student fails to stand up for themselves and they give in to the peer pressure.

It takes a person of extraordinary confidence to look at the gauntlet and tell the group “No, I am not doing this. I am not going to be whipped, and I am not going to whip anyone else. I am here to learn BJJ; I am not here to take part in hazing.” It takes more courage to stand up to the group and say no to the gauntlet than it does to get whipped by belts.

Some proponents of belt whipping argue that this sport is for people that are tough and can take a beating. I argue that BJJ will make a person tough, after all it is a rough experience being on the mat. BJJ is designed for the smaller, weaker person, not the guy who walks in the door already a tough guy. Instead of building the weaker person up, the sight of this hazing is likely to chase them away. Another argument is that the gauntlet is a tradition in BJJ (dating back to the mid 90’s if that counts as tradition). Tradition is important in martial arts, many traditions have a rich history, the gauntlet does not have a rich history. Much like picking fights on the beach this tradition is best left in the past as BJJ is spread around the world.

Let’s address the legal issue with a little more depth. It does not matter to the law whether the student gives implied consent. Their consent to the hazing is not a defense that a social club can use, it is still illegal. If a student is not physically harmed it will typically be a misdemeanor, but if there is an injury the crime of hazing is a felony in many US states. Whipping marks left by a belt could be considered an injury. Gym owners and coaches should heed this warning. By writing this article I am not trying to get anyone in trouble with the law, I just want to see successful gyms with good business practices. Ask yourself what successful business would post illegal activities on social media?Hazing 6 states

It is time to leave this tradition of hazing in the past. The gauntlet is not helping to build stronger or better students, BJJ does that in spite of the gauntlet.

Things like rolling, or a throw are not hazing – they are part of doing BJJ. If your school is participating in hazing its students I recommend sharing this article with your instructor and respectfully sitting out of the process. I am confident that most instructors are simply unaware that they are breaking the law. Help them out by letting them know.

I look forward to reading your comments.

Links

Epi 115 Chris Martin and BJJ 4 Change

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Chris Martin

Chris Martin

Chris Martin is one of the founding members of BJJ4CHANGE. Chris has a long history of doing martial arts and a big passion for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. This episode we will talk about BJJ 4 Change, an organization that is dictated to helping kids through BJJ.

We talk about:

  • What got Chris started in martial arts
  • Why he has such a passion for BJJ
  • Making a BJJ documentary
  • How doing BJJ can help kids on and off the mat
  • The goals of BJJ 4 Change
  • How the plan for BJJ 4 Change has adapted and grown
  • BJJ effecting social changes
  • The lifestyles of the kids that need some help
  • How Jiu-Jitsu helps with confidence
  • Where the money goes when you attend a camp
  • Some of the many benefits of BJJ

bjj4change

Links:

Quote of the week: “Patience and perseverance have a magical effect before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish.” John Quincy Adams

Article of the week: “What I Wish You Knew Before You Started Teaching: A Student’s View

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Catch us next week my friends for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast!

My Trip To Burma (We Are Not In Kansas Anymore)

A few months ago my wife and I traveled to Burma (also called Myanmar) to spend time with family. Our time in Burma was spent in the city of Yangon. This was the first time that I had ever been to Asia. It was truly an amazing trip that I am excited to share with you.  We met a lot of great people, tried new and interesting foods, a pick pocketing experience, and I even had time for a little Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

In general, the people of Burma are very nice and quick to smile.  I was at a large disadvantage with getting to meet strangers because of the language barrier.  I quickly learned a handful of words “hi” and “thank you” being on the top of the list.

Before we departed on our trip I contacted the Yangon BJJ House. I emailed Tammi and the door was opened for a visit. The Yangon BJJ House has a fun group of skilled grapplers. They welcomed me onto their mat like a friend and we were laughing and joking within minutes. This was a great feeling that no matter where in the world you are you can find a BJJ school and feel like you are home. They asked if I would teach the class and I was more than happy to show a couple of techniques and roll with everyone. I got some great mat time in with this group of dedicated grapplers.

Yangon BJJ House

Yangon BJJ House

I had an opportunity to do a BJJ demonstration at a grade school. I jumped on this opportunity. The kids at this school all do Taekwondo every day for exercise. The majority of these kids had never even heard of BJJ, a couple of them said that is was similar to wrestling. My wife and I teamed up to show a few throws, and demonstrate a couple submissions.

Getting Thrown

Getting Thrown

The first throw was so surprising to the kids that some of them screamed and thought that it was fatal! I asked for volunteers to throw me with a (Seoi nage).  Many hands went up and I selected a few kids.

Burma BJJ kids

This is Shane, he performed a great throw.

Now to tell you about my little situation that happened at Shwedagon Pagoda. Shwedagon is a beautiful Pagoda that is visible from all over the city.  We had a wonderful time looking around and learning about this Pagoda.

Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar

Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar

While I was looking around, one of the locals came up to me with a camera in hand and motioned for us to take a picture together (there was a language barrier so no words were spoken). This may seem really odd, because I am not famous.  But in Burma I am a rather large light skinned person, with possibly the biggest nose that these people have ever seen 🙂  This was not the first time that a local person wanted to take a picture of me (more people wanted pictures of my wife and sister-in-law but for their good looks).  Two more of his friends wanted to join the picture and I put my arms around the closet guys.  My brother-in-law joined for the photo bomb behind us.

What happened next was the surprising part.  I felt a thumb trying to needle its way into my back pocket. My pocket has a flap, it was not buttoned but it was down.  He was trying to get past the flap, and I felt this.  I took my arm down from the guy on my right side and grabbed his hand with my hand.  Stopping him from getting my wallet, he was busted! Next I smiled for the camera (the wrong camera) and we took the picture. I was excited to get this photographed. After the picture we separated. His friends (I think knowing that he had failed) wanted to take another picture, they did not realize that he got busted. I smiled and made it clear to them and my group that we are not taking another picture because I don’t want to lose my wallet.

Here is on of my favorite pictures from my trip to Burma. The guy to my left is trying to pick my pocket.

Here is on of my favorite pictures from my trip to Burma. The guy to my left is trying to pick my pocket.

I never felt threatened by this group of men. Nor did I feel the need to react in a more dramatic or violent way. I did not want a problem even if it was not my problem, I did not want to find myself dealing with the local police. I was just happy that I kept my wallet. I was confident that my group could handle a confrontation if one happened, but I was happy to just be on my way.

This was the only time in Burma that we had any problem with security. My brother in law and his wife stayed in Burma for a year and had no problems like this.  After we stayed in Burma for a week we went to Bangkok for a week where I hiked up the tallest building in Thailand and got kicked out by security when I made it all the way to the roof, Great Success! Check that video out here!

We have all had training partners like this. Too big too strong.

Did not roll with him

The Floating Market

The Floating Market

Please no sex in the park

Please no sex in the park

Rolling in Burma

Rolling in Burma

Epi 113 Travleing With Scott Boehler

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Scott Boehler of BJJ Rally

Scott Boehler of BJJ Rally

This week we bring you Scott Boehler. Scott is a brown belt from Montana.  He has been traveling the United States and Canada in his van training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

We talk about:

  • His goals with traveling
  • How he decided to leave Montana to train
  • Politics between schools in the same city
  • How to approach a gym you don’t know
  • Paying mat fees
  • Living out of a van
  • Where to park a van over night and not get into trouble
  • What it takes for your gym to be welcoming
  • Teaching vs doing martial arts
  • Learning from coaches and athletes
  • A list of places that he have visited

Links:

Quote of the week: “The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me.” Ayn Rand. Presented by Roli Delgado

Article of the week: Train in the Gi to improve your No Gi

Just Another Lion to Kill Rashguard

Your first year of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu audio book

Catch us next week for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast

Epi 112 Roll Out Jiu-Jitsu With Mark Fisher

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Mark Fisher is a brown belt training at SGBi in Portland Oregon. He is one of the people that is running a Facebook page called Roll Out Jiu-Jitsu. Roll Out Jiu-Jjitsu is a online support group to help grapples that identify with LGBTQI.

Roll Out Jiu-Jitsu

Roll Out Jiu-Jitsu

We talk about:

  • The facebook page RollOut
  • The interview with Kurt Osiander from episode 108
  • Trainnig BJJ and not being out
  • How to find the correct BJJ gym for you
  • Mark’s first day of BJJ
  • How to make you gym more friendly to the LGBTQI community
  • The type of game that Mark plays
  • Why he will try to not over use his flexibility
  • Tips for new competitors
  • The start of a BJJ match compared to the start of a chess match
  • Developing a game plan
  • Why you might want to shrink your game
  • Training on a limited schedule

Fisher me_camp_2014

Links:

Other SBGi coaches that have been on The BjjBrick Podcast!

Quote of the week: “Set a goal so big that you can’t achieve it until you grow into the person who can.”

Article of the week: Fools Gold

Catch us next week for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast

 

Epi 71 Interview With Robson Moura

The BjjBrick Podcast is in iTunesand Stitcher radioRobson Moura bjj

This week we are happy to bring you an interview with Robson Moura.  In the Black belt Super Featherweight division Robson won gold in 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 and then again in 2007.  He credits much of his competition success in going for a fast submission.

Some Highlights from the interview:

We also talk about:

  • How BJJ helps him off of the mat
  • Starting BJJ as a kid in the adult class
  • Why he likes to have a fun environment in his school
  • How the mind of the Jiu-Jitsu competitor has changed over time
  • What he is looking for in a super fight
  • The possibility of doing Metamoris
  • Advice for first time competitors
  • Why most people are joining  BJJ schools today
  • Why survival is a good goal for a 1st year student

links for Robson Moura

Quote of the week: “every champion was once a contender that refused to give up” Presented by Isaac Doederlein

Article of the week: “Jiu Jitsu And The Mature Athlete” jjgf.com

Catch us next week for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast