BjjBrick Q&A 19 Am I Too Passive?

Question: I’m 3 months in and I have a question for you. I’m 38 years old and most of the guys at the school are in their 20’s. they have high energy, they’re fit, they move quickly. I just don’t seem to have an intense killer instinct to win a roll, I’m a very passive personality, very submissive, I was never into sports. I recognize Jiu Jitsu as an effective FOR of self defense that I may need one day and I’m sure if needed I could operate at 110% in an emergency, but in a roll I just don’t seem to have an intensity that I see others have. Do you think that’s something I could develop over time or something that can be taught?

Epi 172 Six Amazing Black Belts Answer Questions About Blue Belts

This week we have a HUGE episode. We take six well known and respected black belts and ask them all the same five questions about blue belts. There are some similarities and differences within these interviews but the amount of jiu-jitsu wisdom about blue belts in this episode is amazing.

The five questions we asked to the six black belt guests

  1. Do you have requirements for a blue belt? What are they?
  2. How important is it for students to be able to “defend” their belt?
  3. How many intangibles (good teammate, good effort, helps others) come into play when promoting someone to blue belt?
  4. Do you ever regret giving someone a blue belt?
  5. What advice to you have for the new blue belt?

 

Tim Sledd 24m 25s

  1. Tim explains some of the techniques he requires for a student to know before receiving a blue belt.
  2. Tim talks about why some students get tapped by lower belts and if it is a big deal.
  3. Why he looks at character of a student not just technique, and how this can hold someone back.
  4. Why he has no regrets of any belts he has given out.
  5. Advice for the new blue belt.

Matt Thornton 58m 30s

  1. How he evaluates blue belts based on performance, and not looking at particular techniques.
  2. Why it is important for your first blue belts to be very good at a school.
  3. The importance of having good people on the mat.
  4. Why he is confident in all his blue belt students.
  5. Why it is important to relax and work on open guard as a blue belt.

Bernardo Faria 1h 17m 30s

  1. Bernardo talks about Fabio Gurgel’s system to get a blue belt a student must attend 120 classes.
  2. The idea of not tapping to a lower belt is an old mentality.
  3. Having a bad attitude will hold students back.
  4. Not having an actual belt test, and not regretting giving someone a blue belt.
  5. Keep your ego low, and work on learning jiu-jitsu.

Daniel Covel 1h 25m 05s

  1. His minimum requirements of techniques for a blue belt. The responsibilities of the instructor to the students.
  2. The importance of learning from your mistakes, and making adjustments.
  3. Why it is important to have good people and teammates on the mat.
  4. He has no regrets about any of his past blue belts.
  5. It is important to recognise the hard work on the mats.

Henry Akins 1h 42m 50s

  1. Understanding the basic positions and a handful of basic submissions.
  2. Why some upper belts get caught by lower belts.
  3. Why it is important for a blue belt to be a good training partner.
  4. Why getting tapped out is part of the learning process
  5. Why blue belts should work hard to develop a strong base.

John Will 1h 59m 30s

  1. Why he likes having requirements for blue belts but not so many for other belts.
  2. It is rare for a colored belt to get tapped by a lower belt, but it is no big deal.
  3. Why the culture of the gym is so important. The concept of a ox neck and rat’s head.
  4. It is often normal to feel like you don’t deserve a new belt
  5. Ask five simple questions for every technique you learn to learn more details.

Mat Tales 14 Mouse in the House

Quote of the week: “Do the difficult things while they are easy and do the great things while they are small. A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.” Lao Tzu

Article of the week: Production Now and Production Long Term

Your-First-Year-Of-BJJ-artwork-1199

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catch us next week for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast

The BjjBrick Podcast is in iTunesStitcher radio, and Google Play Music for Andriod

Print off this 2014 motivational calendar

This calendar was left blank to help you reach any goal that you have.  I hope some of you will use it to achieve your goals in BJJ!

Fill out the legend with activities that you can do to help you reach your goals.  Everyday cross off the date with any of the marks that you did that day.  After a few days or weeks it will be painful to skip a day or two.  After a month or two these activates will become a habits and you will be doing the things you need to accomplish your goals.

Share success stories or pictures of your calendar at Bjjbrick@gmail.com

I have made two different quotes for the calendar.  The calendar will print perfectly on a normal size sheet of paper.  Print it off and get to crossing off days and making a chain.

“Excellence is not a singular act but a habit, You are what you repeatedly do.” Shaquille Oneal

“You can’t change what did yesterday, and tomorrow is uncertain, all you can do is make today count.” BjjBrick

 

calendar bjjbrick quotecalendar shaq quote

Stuck in a choke

Some chokes in BJJ will happen so fast you will find yourself tapping without even thinking. Then there are chokes that you get stuck in and you have some time to work. Here are three simple things to remember when you find yourself stuck in a choke.

Nobody likes being stuck in a choke

1) Stay calm– If you are new to BJJ and being choked this probably sounds crazy. I am not suggesting that you relax your body, I am suggesting that you mentally stay calm. Realize that you can tap anytime to stop the choke. Know that win or lose you will be okay; this should help prevent you from freaking out. You don’t want to tap too soon on a choke that you could have fought out of.

2) Think– You are going to need to find a way out of this choke. Hopefully you know at least two escapes from the choke that you are stuck in. If you know some escapes, get to work disassembling the choke. If you find yourself confused about what to do, work to create space. Any space you make increases the time you have and the chance that his choke will fall apart. If you are confused and have time, try to picture what the two of you look like from the view of someone standing next to you. This may help you to find space, a direction to move, or roll.

3) Wait– Waiting does not get you out of a choke, but sometimes your opponent will be spending massive amounts of energy trying to finish the choke. If you can outlast them they will often just let go trying to transition to the next attack, or take a break. Although waiting is not a good strategy if you can push yourself a few more seconds there will be some chokes that you defeat that would have otherwise had you tapping.

Being stuck in a choke that is not quite good enough to finish the job is a horrible place to be. You will be in a lot of discomfort, and there is a good chance that you will be losing the match in a few moments. Chokes are different than other submissions because you are less likely to get injured. Go ahead and work on your escapes without the fear of a broken arm or leg. Hopefully this advice will come to mind and serve you well when you are in this tough spot.

Other articles you might like:

3 Simple tips for white belts to get a better guard

Slow down while you are rolling to improve your BJJ

For more good times like Facebook.com/BjjBrick

3 Simple tips for white belts to get a better guard

The guard skills that you develop as a white belt will benefit you for the rest of your BJJ career.  Here are three simple things that you could do today to help you get a better guard.  After all, you don’t want to be a blue belt still trying to learn the basics of the guard.

1. Pull guard– It may seem like a simple idea, but if you are playing a top game all the time your guard will suffer.  You need to spend time using your guard while rolling.  Don’t wait for the chance that you randomly get to use your guard, put yourself there and get to work.

2. Try things– Everyone has their own style of guard.  You are going to need to experiment with a variety of techniques to find a few that work well for you.  After you find a couple of sweeps and submissions that you think work great for you – do them!  Don’t just hold your partner in closed guard and react to what they do.  It is better to attack and put them on the defense.

3. Work your escapes– Lets face it, there are some growing pains that come with guard development.  Your guard is going to get passed, and you are going to get submitted.  It will be helpful if you are planning to work on side control and mount escapes before you even step on the mat.  Have a couple of escapes for each in mind (preferably escapes that get you your guard back).  That way when your guard gets passed you know what you are going to try next.

It takes time to develop a deadly guard but these tips should help you get there.  Remember while you are rolling you are learning.

Other articles you might like:

Drill one handed

Slow down while you are rolling to improve your Jiu-Jitsu

Thanks for reading, like me on Facebook.com/BjjBrick

Running a marathon and training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

At the time I ran my marathon I was a purple belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ), and had ran two half marathons.  This is an article about accomplishing my goal of running a marathon and not sacrificing my BJJ training.  Like most people who train BJJ, missing a day can be tough and taking several months off to get ready for a marathon was not an option.  I love that BJJ keeps me in shape but I would need to spend a lot of time running to prepare my body for running 26.2 miles.

My sister and me before the run

Having ran two half marathons and training BJJ 2 to 4 times a week, I felt good starting with short distances of 2 to 6 miles.  I think that my conditioning from BJJ was a big help getting me started.  Once I started to run more than 6 miles I really felt like my legs where getting pushed passed their typical BJJ endurance.I thought that my BJJ endurance would skyrocket and I would be able to be on the mat all day.  I was wrong about this.  My endurance was better, but my legs would be tired from the first moment I stepped on the mat.  It seemed like once I started to run more than 15 miles, I was not as strong on the mats due to my legs never being able to fully recover.  Some days my body would feel like it was too sore from running to train BJJ, but I would go anyway.  I would tell myself that I was sore not injured, and training on the mats was a great way for me to stretch my muscles.  The day after BJJ training, I would feel really good.  Training BJJ definitely helped me recover from my long runs.  It was a good way for me to cross train.

My marathon experience.  My main goal was to finish the marathon, no mater what the time.  Living in Kansas I was fortunate to run in one of the flattest marathons in the country.  I decided that this would likely be the only marathon that I would run so I should give 100%.  I ended up finishing in 4 hours and 3 minutes, which is about a 9 minutes 16 seconds per mile pace.

I really believe that most people who can run a few miles are capable of completing a full marathon.  You simply add distance gradually and don’t worry about your time.  I would recommend running a half marathon before doing the full, if you have the discipline and ability to run a half marathon you can run the full marathon.  Training to run a full marathon is a big time commitment.  I found myself running 6 to 8 hours a week, and due to the heat I was forced to run in the early morning.  If you are a student of BJJ and you want to run a marathon, I would recommend that you continue training BJJ during your marathon training.  I would not recommend competing in BJJ tournaments while you are running long distances, your body will not be at full competition strength.  It is also smart to tap out to foot locks a little quicker than usual if you are like me and like to try to fight out of them. Completing a marathon may not improve your Jiu-Jitsu skills, but it certainly will add to your mental toughness.

not a scenic run, but it is flat

If completing a marathon is a goal of yours go for it!  If you have any questions that I can help you with your training email me atBjjBrick@gmail.com (put “marathon” in the subject).

Check out this website for more marathon training advice

Thanks for reading, like me on Facebook.com/BjjBrick