Epi 251 The Growth of the Adaptive Athlete Community with Brian Freeman

We are really happy to bring BJJ purple belt Brian Freeman for another interview. Brian is a disabled vet with a T4 spinal cord injury with Brown-Sequard syndrome. He is from Rockingham, North Carolina.

We talk about:

  • The growth of adaptive athletes in BJJ
  • Getting his blue and purple belts
  • Some of his favorite techniques
  • Dealing with high mount
  • Using Social media to build the adaptive athlete community
  • Stories of competing
  • What BJJ has done for him off the mat
  • Doing marathons in his wheelchair
  • Advice for other adaptive athletes wanting to start Jiu-Jitsu
  • Training advice

Links:

Quote of the week: “Strong people are hard to kill” presented by Kevan Sr. at the BjjBrick Summer Camp

Article of the week: Muay Thai for BJJ

 

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Catch us next week for another episode of The BjjBrick Podcast

The BjjBrick Podcast is in iTunesStitcher radio, and Google Play Music for Andriod

Episode 250 Video with Tim Sledd and Roli Delgado

This is a first for The BjjBrick Podcast. We recorded this at the BjjBrick Summer Camp 2018 inside Fox Fitness. Enjoy the change of pace for this landmark 250 episode. We also pull a prank on Gary, the video shows the pictures we put together of him.

Here is a link to the normal mp3 episode http://bjjbrick.com/epi-250-live-tim-sledd-and-roli-delgado-recording-at-the-bjjbrick-summer-camp/

Too Much Knowledge Can Slow the Learning Process in BJJ

This may seem counterintuitive but stick with me for a bit.

Let’s step off the mats for just a second and look at learning a golf swing. The golf swing can be broken down into many parts. Let’s just look at the setup as outlined here 50 Best Swing Keys. You need to have your legs properly positioned with your feet outside your hips, and your toes pointed outward at a 25 degree angle. Now you need to have your upper left arm on the top of your chest, and your right arm needs to be slightly bent at the elbow. Then you need to have your right shoulder slightly lower than your left, and you need to be holding the shaft perpendicular to the ground.

That is a lot of stuff to do and you have not even started to move yet. The article goes into much more detail about how to properly smack the life out of the ball.

Even if I did have some knowledge of golf (I don’t) taking in a long list of different aspects all at once is a lot to ask of someone wanting a better swing.

The same thing can happen in BJJ if you are coaching to correct every little detail, the learning process can actually slow down. Instead fix one or two main things, and acknowledge one or two things that are done well. When the corrections have been made, build on that by fixing one or two more things.

Teaching too much can make students overwhelmed. Frustrated students are not in the state of mind to learn.

You might think that this coaching advice is mostly geared toward helping new students. I would argue that novice or expert will struggle to make more than one or two corrections at a time.

We can all improve, gaining knowledge needs to be at a rate that is conducive to learning.

Ideas for this article were inspired from the books Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better and Peak secrets for the new science of expertise 

Byron

Coaching Tip- Critique vs Correct In BJJ

These two things may seem to be the same, but they are actually significantly different. In this short article you will find out the difference and learn why I am such a fan of one over the other.

Let’s say we are rolling, and I have side control. You are doing a pretty good job to build a frame and you try to escape. Then your arm relaxes a bit and I isolate it and take the armbar. My critique would be that your should keep your arms in a safe position. That is good advice, and I hope you can put it to use next time someone has you in side control and tries to put your arm in danger.

Let’s look at the same scenario and use correction instead of critique. Now where were we? Oh yeah. Your arm relaxes a bit and I isolate it and start to take the armbar. I know you feel something bad is headed your way. Then I say “pause for a second, can you feel your arm is out of position?” You agree. “Let’s rewind and see what happened, to get you to this spot.” It turns out that as you attempting to get your legs in to recover guard your arm became a bit too loose “Let’s do it again but this time as you are working your legs in also pay attention to your arm, especially your left one.”

With the correction you get to try to fix the problem in the moment. You get to feel it working and make adjustments to your game in a more live setting.

If you tell me what mistakes I made after I tap, thanks for the critique. If you have me pause and rewind a few steps to show me my mistakes, thanks for the correction. They are both good learning tools but the correction allows me to practice what you are telling me. The correction allows both my body and mind to experience the practice together, and this greatly helps with long term retention.

Think of giving someone a critique as giving them a tip, and giving someone a correction as giving them a short pertinent lesson.

The words “pause” and “rewind” are becoming some the my best coaching words while I roll.

Ideas for this article were inspired from the book Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better

Byron

DVD Review Kristian Woodmansee AP De La Riva Guard

In this DVD Kristian Woodmansee teaches you things to take your De La Riva guard to the next level. He also shows some very good passes and drills

This DVD can be found here https://www.thefighthub.com/shop/ap-de-la-riva-guard-dvd/

Please comment below if you have this dvd, I would like to know your thoughts.

 

Elite Sports Gym Bag Review For BJJ and MMA

I was in need of a new gym bag to help me get all my gear to BJJ class in an organized fashion.  In the past I always just used a random duffel bag as a gym bag. This is my first time to use a gym bag that was made for athletes in mind. As the weeks have gone by I realize that I spent the last 15 years of training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu using the wrong types of bags.

Here are my biggest pros about this bag:

  1. Quality of construction
  2. Large enough for what I need but not huge
  3. Pocket for water bottle
  4. See through mesh pocket
  5. Small pockets inside for little items
  6. Converts into a backpack
  7. Washable

This bag comes in a Variety of colors and can be found here.
https://www.elitesports.com/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-bjj-gear-bags