Coaching Tip- Critique vs Correct In BJJ

These two things may seem to be the same, but they are actually significantly different. In this short article you will find out the difference and learn why I am such a fan of one over the other.

Let’s say we are rolling, and I have side control. You are doing a pretty good job to build a frame and you try to escape. Then your arm relaxes a bit and I isolate it and take the armbar. My critique would be that your should keep your arms in a safe position. That is good advice, and I hope you can put it to use next time someone has you in side control and tries to put your arm in danger.

Let’s look at the same scenario and use correction instead of critique. Now where were we? Oh yeah. Your arm relaxes a bit and I isolate it and start to take the armbar. I know you feel something bad is headed your way. Then I say “pause for a second, can you feel your arm is out of position?” You agree. “Let’s rewind and see what happened, to get you to this spot.” It turns out that as you attempting to get your legs in to recover guard your arm became a bit too loose “Let’s do it again but this time as you are working your legs in also pay attention to your arm, especially your left one.”

With the correction you get to try to fix the problem in the moment. You get to feel it working and make adjustments to your game in a more live setting.

If you tell me what mistakes I made after I tap, thanks for the critique. If you have me pause and rewind a few steps to show me my mistakes, thanks for the correction. They are both good learning tools but the correction allows me to practice what you are telling me. The correction allows both my body and mind to experience the practice together, and this greatly helps with long term retention.

Think of giving someone a critique as giving them a tip, and giving someone a correction as giving them a short pertinent lesson.

The words “pause” and “rewind” are becoming some the my best coaching words while I roll.

Ideas for this article were inspired from the book Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better

Byron

DVD Review Kristian Woodmansee AP De La Riva Guard

In this DVD Kristian Woodmansee teaches you things to take your De La Riva guard to the next level. He also shows some very good passes and drills

This DVD can be found here https://www.thefighthub.com/shop/ap-de-la-riva-guard-dvd/

Please comment below if you have this dvd, I would like to know your thoughts.

 

Elite Sports Gym Bag Review For BJJ and MMA

I was in need of a new gym bag to help me get all my gear to BJJ class in an organized fashion.  In the past I always just used a random duffel bag as a gym bag. This is my first time to use a gym bag that was made for athletes in mind. As the weeks have gone by I realize that I spent the last 15 years of training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu using the wrong types of bags.

Here are my biggest pros about this bag:

  1. Quality of construction
  2. Large enough for what I need but not huge
  3. Pocket for water bottle
  4. See through mesh pocket
  5. Small pockets inside for little items
  6. Converts into a backpack
  7. Washable

This bag comes in a Variety of colors and can be found here.
https://www.elitesports.com/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-bjj-gear-bags

 

BjjBrick Q&A Q17 Help with lacking a BJJ curriculum

Here is the question:

I started BBJ 3 weeks ago and love it. The only thing is there isn’t a curriculum, starting course, or even drills…. I just go, learn some moves and roll. As a white belt, I’m trying to breath, be safe, and learn the fundamentals… but I am not taught them exactly so I have started using youtube Gracie videos… I want to keep showing up and putting in work to show my coach how motivated I am to learn this art… but I’m not sure if I should bring up my problems now or later…